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Sleeps Standing

A Story of the Battle of Orakau

Author: Witi Ihimaera and Hemi Kelly  

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A little book containing so much- a novella, history, eyewitness reports, Maori translation, verse and images.

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$24.01
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Paperback

PRODUCT INFORMATION

Summary

A little book containing so much- a novella, history, eyewitness reports, Maori translation, verse and images.

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Description

Both fiction and fact, this fascinating book is a kaleidoscopic exploration of the Battle of Orakau.

During three days in 1864, 300 Maori men, women and children fought an Imperial army and captured the imagination of the world. The battle marked the end of the Land Wars in the Waikato and resulted in vast tracts of land being confiscated for European settlement. Instead of following the usual standpoint of the victors, this book takes a Maori perspective. It is centred around Witi Ihimaera's moving novella, Sleeps Standing, which views the battle through the eyes of a 16-year-old boy named Moetu.

Alongside the novella are non-fiction narratives from Maori eyewitnesses, together with images and a Maori translation by Hemi Kelly, further giving voice to and illuminating the people who tried to protect their culture and land.

It is estimated that, at the height of the battle, 1700 immensely superior troops, well-armed and amply resourced, laid siege to the hastily constructed pa at Orakau. The defenders were heavily outnumbered with few supplies or weapons but, when told to submit, they replied-

'E hoa, ka whawhai tonu matou, ake, ake, ake!' 'Friend, I shall fight against you for ever, for ever!'

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About the Author

Witi Ihimaera (Author) Witi Ihimaera was the first Maori to publish both a book of short stories and a novel, and since then has published many notable novels and collections of short stories. Described by Metro magazine as 'Part oracle, part memoralist,' and 'an inspired voice, weaving many stories together', Ihimaera has also written for stage and screen, edited books on the arts and culture, as well as published various works for children.

His best-known novel is The Whale Rider, which was made into a hugely, internationally successful film in 2002. His novel Nights in the Garden of Spain was also made into a feature film, and was distributed internationally under the name of Kawa. The feature film White Lies was based on his novella Medicine Woman. And his novel Bulibasha, King of the Gypsies inspired the 2016 feature film Mahana. His first book, Pounamu, Pounamu, has not been out of print in the 40 years since publication.

He has also had careers in diplomacy, teaching, theatre, opera, film and television. In 1993 Ihimaera spent a year in France on the Katherine Mansfield Fellowship. He has received numerous awards, including the Wattie Book of the Year Award and the Montana Book Award, the inaugural Star of Oceania Award, University of Hawaii 2009, a laureate award from the New Zealand Arts Foundation 2009, the Toi Maori Maui Tiketike Award 2011, and the Premio Ostana International Award, presented to him in Italy 2010. In 2004 he became a Distinguished Companion of the Order of New Zealand (the equivalent of a knighthood).

Witi Ihimaera has said that he considers 'the world I'm in as being Maori, not European' and that he writes from this perspective. While much of his fiction is based on fact, it is not strictly autobiographical but is an imaginative recreation of places, people and circumstances. For a period of about 10 years, though, he stopped publishing, feeling that his attempts to capture the emotional landscape of Maori were being perceived as the 'definitive portrayal' of Maoridom. This was from the mid-1970s when there was a resurgence of Maori activism.

Receiving the premiere Maori arts award Te Tohutiketike a Te Waka Toi, Ihimaera said, 'To be given Maoridom's highest cultural award, well, it's recognition of the iwi. Without them, I would have nothing to write about and there would be no Ihimaera. So this award is for all those ancestors who have made us all the people we are. It is also for the generations to come, to show them that even when you aren't looking, destiny has a job for you to do.'

Ihimaera is a respected commentator on Maori, Pacific and indigenous peoples' affairs, and has been instrumental in ensuring Maori art and literature is supported.

The Parihaka Woman, 'a fun dash through 19th-century New Zealand, speckled with adventure' (Bay of Plenty Times), was the third bestselling New Zealand fiction work in 2010. Recognised for its 'moments of tender beauty' (The New Zealand Herald) and for being 'richly imaginative and original . . . surprising, inventive and deeply moving' it 'confirms Witi Ihimaera as one of New Zealand's finest and most memorable storytellers' (Tararua District Library).

With The Thrill of Falling, Ihimaera has taken a new route with his writing, 'full of experimentation and literary derring-do' (John McCrystal, Weekend Herald). The Saturday Express noted that he writes with 'a great combination of the punchiness of a short story, along with more development of character and plot . . . creating characters that seem to come alive off the pages', the Otago Daily Times reviewer noting that he weaves references to Maori mythology and New Zealand into his stories in 'an easy, playful and relaxed style, while pulling off twists and brilliant touches'.

Hemi Kelly (Author) Hemi Kelly is of Ngati Maniapoto and Ngati Tahu-Ngati Whaoa descent. He started learning te reo Maori as a young teenager and naturally progressed into teaching roles after study. Hemi is a full-time lecturer in te reo Maori at the Auckland University of Technology. His academic research and writing focus largely on the revitalsation of the Maori language and translation studies.

Hemi is a licensed translator and graduate of Te Panekiretanga o Te Reo (The Institute of Excellence in the Maori Language). In 2017, Hemi translated Witi Ihimaera's novella in Sleeps Standing and published his first book A Maori Word a Day in 2018. In 2019, Hemi published his first creative writing piece in English in Purakau, a collection of Maori myths retold by Maori writers.

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Product Details

Publisher
Random House New Zealand Ltd | Vintage New Zealand
Published
16th April 2019
Pages
224
ISBN
9780143773887
$24.01
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Dispatches in 31-33 days from Auckland
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