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Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America

Erika Lee and Judy Yung


  • Paperback
    $63.70
ISBN: 9780199896158
ANNOTATION:
From 1910 to 1940, the Angel Island immigration station in San Francisco served as the processing and detention center for over one million people from around the world. The full history of these immigrants and their experiences on Angel Island is told for the first time in this landmark book.
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  • Paperback
    $63.70
ISBN: 9780199896158
ANNOTATION:
From 1910 to 1940, the Angel Island immigration station in San Francisco served as the processing and detention center for over one million people from around the world. The full history of these immigrants and their experiences on Angel Island is told for the first time in this landmark book.

Annotation

From 1910 to 1940, the Angel Island immigration station in San Francisco served as the processing and detention center for over one million people from around the world. The full history of these immigrants and their experiences on Angel Island is told for the first time in this landmark book.

Publisher Description

From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people sailed through the Golden Gate, hoping to start a new life in America. But they did not all disembark in San Francisco; instead, most were ferried across the bay to the Angel Island Immigration Station. For many, this was the real gateway to the United States. For others, it was a prison and their final destination, before being sent home. In this landmark book, historians Erika Lee and Judy Yung (both descendants of immigrants detained on the island) provide the first comprehensive history of the Angel Island Immigration Station. Drawing on extensive new research, including immigration records, oral histories, and inscriptions on the barrack walls, the authors produce a sweeping yet intensely personal history of Chinese "paper sons," Japanese picture brides, Korean students, South Asian political activists, Russian and Jewish refugees, Mexican families, Filipino repatriates, and many others from around the world. Their experiences on Angel Island reveal how America's discriminatory immigration policies changed the lives of immigrants and transformed the nation. A place of heartrending history and breathtaking beauty, the Angel Island Immigration Station is a National Historic Landmark, and like Ellis Island, it is recognized as one of the most important sites where America's immigration history was made. This fascinating history is ultimately about America itself and its complicated relationship to immigration, a story that continues today.

Author Biography

Lee is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

Table of Contents

Foreword ; Preface ; Introduction ; Chapter One: Guarding the Golden Gate: The Life and Business of the Immigration Station ; Chapter Two: "One Hundred Kinds of Oppressive Laws": Chinese Immigrants in the Shadow of Exclusion ; Chapter Four: "Obstacles This Way, Blockades That Way": South Asian Immigrants, U.S. Exclusion, and the Gadar Movement ; Chapter Five: "A People without a Country": Korean Refugee Students and Picture Brides ; Chapter Six: In Search of Refuge, Freedom, and Opportunity: Russians, Jews, and Mennonites in the Promised Land ; Chapter Seven: El Norte: Mexican Immigrants on Angel Island ; Chapter Eight: From "U.S. Nationals" to "Aliens": Filipino Migration and Repatriation through Angel Island ; Chapter 9: Saving Angel Island ; Epilogue: The Legacy of Angel Island ; Appendix A ; Appendix B ; Appendix C ; Notes/ Bibliography ; Notes/ Bibliography

Review

The authors of this book show a strong commitment to the topic, which is stimulated by their own, often painful, family histories ... The immigrants are at the core of this book Hans Krabbendam, Journal of American Studies This is a masterpiece and a worthy contribution to a better understanding of the role Angel Island played in American history. Peter Kwong, Hunter College, The American Historical Review

Long Description

From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people sailed through the Golden Gate, hoping to start a new life in America. But they did not all disembark in San Francisco; instead, most were ferried across the bay to the Angel Island Immigration Station. For many, this was the real gateway to the United States. For others, it was a prison and their final destination, before being sent home.In this landmark book, historians Erika Lee and Judy Yung (both descendants of immigrants detained on the island) provide the first comprehensive history of the Angel Island Immigration Station. Drawing on extensive new research, including immigration records, oral histories, and inscriptions on the barrack walls, the authors produce a sweeping yet intensely personal history of Chinese "paper sons," Japanese picture brides, Korean students, South Asian political activists, Russian and Jewish refugees, Mexican families, Filipino repatriates, and many others from around the world. Their experiences on Angel Island reveal how America's discriminatory immigration policies changed the lives of immigrants and transformed the nation. A place of heartrending history and breathtaking beauty, the Angel Island Immigration Station is a National Historic Landmark, and like Ellis Island, it is recognized as one of the most important sites where America's immigration history was made. This fascinating history is ultimately about America itself and its complicated relationship to immigration, a story that continues today.

Review Text

"The book is...an important work that effectively synthesizes multiple group histories and integrates institutional and social history. Its detailed storytelling, elegant writing, beautiful illustrations, and focus on an underappreciated yet iconic place on the West Coast make it a pleasurable read and a welcome addition to the literature on U.S. migration." --The Western Historical Quarterly "Lee and Young offer a meticulously researched and sweeping view of immigration in America, one that is shaped by global economic and social conditions as well as racial, religious, class, and gendered views of those migrants coming to America." --The Public Historian "Erika Lee and Judy Yung have written the definitive book on Angel Island. The book is meticulously researched and covers not just the Chinese experience but the experiences of all the people who passed through the immigration station. Lee and Yung have used the personal stories of immigrants to make time and place come alive, reminding us that history is something that happens to real people and their families."--Lisa See, author of On Gold Mountain: The One-Hundred-Year Odyssey of a Chinese-American Family "With this comprehensive history, Angel Island may now stand alongside Ellis Island as the other iconic gateway to America. Lee and Yung give a thorough and humane look at the immigrants from surprisingly diverse origins who encountered an America both welcoming and unwelcoming on the Pacific coast."--Mae M. Ngai, author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America "In this meticulously researched and richly detailed book, Lee and Yung have unlocked Angel Island's deepest secrets and the link between US immigration policy and restrictive codas of race, gender, class. Their spell-binding narrative lets us journey with Anglos and Latinos as well as Asians and myriad others as they attempt to pass through the eye of the Immigration Station needle--with often vastly different results. Deeply relevant to present-day immigration debates, this book is people's history at its best."--Helen Zia, author of Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People "With scholarly care and a great feel for the stories of those who passed through Angel Island, Erika Lee and Judy Yung have finally given this important historic site its due. This book teases out the complexities of America''s immigration laws and their enforcement and in doing so greatly adds to our understanding of the immigrant experience."--Vincent J. Cannato, author of American Passage: The History of Ellis Island "Reading Angel Island, a gripping new book on America's immigrant history, feels like traveling over familiar territory, except that someone turned the road signs in the opposite direction....More than a superb historical text...an essential document in the on-going debate over American freedom."--California Literary Review "Lee and Yung offer a kaleidoscope of immigrant portraits that bring history alive, and, in the process, demolish many myths and stereotypes about Angel Island and American immigration in general." -San Francisco Chronicle

Feature

Conferences: Association of Asian American Studies Organization of American Historians American Studies Association Oral History Association American Historical Association Western History Association National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference, National Conference on Public History Selling point: Adult Non-Fiction winner of the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature Selling point: Based on newly-discovered poems and inscriptions found on the walls of the immigration station's detention barracks, new oral histories, autobiographies, personal papers, photographs, and family histories of immigrants and immigration officials Selling point: Looks at all of the groups who came through Angel Island, including Chinese, Japanese, Mexicans, Russians, etc

Product Details

Author
Erika Lee, Judy Yung
Short Title
ANGEL ISLAND
Language
English
ISBN-10
0199896151
ISBN-13
9780199896158
Media
Book
Format
Paperback
Pages
394
Illustrations
Yes
Year
2012
Subtitle
Immigrant Gateway to America
Residence
Twin Cities, MN, US
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Audience
Professional and Scholarly
Country of Publication
United States
Publication Date
2012-08-08